How Healthcare Brands Benefit From Programmatic

Programmatic adoption is rapidly rising, but some healthcare brands are still wary of making the investment. Guidelines put in place by government agencies are confusing, and the uncertainties surrounding patient privacy and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) regulations are blurry. Healthcare brands want to reach the right audience for their services or products, but they don’t want to cross ethical or legal lines by taking audience targeting too far. Healthcare is one of the highest regulated industries and consumer health and medical record information is heavily protected, making it difficult to target the right audience online. Healthcare brands are limited in how they can track healthcare-based journeys, and they are unable to identify and retarget consumers based on known conditions. But the benefits of programmatic are promising. Keep reading to learn how healthcare brands can take on the digital space with confidence.
Why Programmatic? What are the Benefits?
71% of American adults venture online to learn more about healthcare information. By implementing programmatic strategies, healthcare and pharmaceutical brands are able to reach this promising audience quickly and effectively. And with 40% of consumers making healthcare-related decisions based on information found online, programmatic becomes a marketing must-have for healthcare brands. The digital space is where people research answers to questions and concerns about health. If they have a symptom, they look up potential causes. If something feels wrong, Google becomes the all-knowing provider of advice. Reaching these audiences online with targeted, contextually relevant ads (that abide by digital laws and regulations,) healthcare brands can break through the noise and actively engage potential customers. Before you get started, below are three things you should keep in mind if you’re planning to invest in programmatic

  1. Understand Data Consent: It is essential for brands to acknowledge the NAI’s regulations pertaining to the collection of healthcare data before implementing programmatic strategies. According to the NAI, consumer consent of data collection is mandatory when sources pertain to sensitive health conditions such as mental health, cancer, HIV, AIDS, etc. When it comes to less urgent conditions such as dieting, acne, colds, or allergies, however, data collection consent is no longer necessary.
  2. Target Based on Interest:  Consumers cannot be targeted or retargeted by healthcare brands based on health conditions. But they can be targeted based on their interests in conditions or symptoms. A healthcare brand can use what is known in the form of past content consumed to programmatically deliver ads. Though a brand cannot target someone with a certain disease, condition, or sickness, they can promote offerings to general audiences that are older and search for similar symptoms. These brands may not reach the perfect candidate, but they are increasing the probability of doing so tremendously.
  3. Target Based on Content: Healthcare ads can be programmatically placed next to related content in the form of blog posts, videos, forums, and so on. The consumers searching for this content cannot be targeted or followed, but the content that reaches the right people can be pursued. Think of an anti-inflammatory drug popping up next to a blog about stomach pain. From there, whitelists can be used by pharma brands to assure that the same programmatic ads refrain from popping up on unreliable sites.

The future of programmatic for healthcare marketing is promising but undoubtedly complex. If you are ready to learn more about how you can leverage programmatic in your brand’s marketing plan, we’re ready to talk. Contact us today to get started!

2019 Travel & Tourism Trends: A Digital Marketer’s Programmatic Passport – Part 5

Summer is a little over a month away and digital consumers are just a search, scroll, and click away from taking advantage of the flexibility that the season grants, as many take a break from their day-to-day and book the perfect getaway. As one of the largest industries, projected to reach $2.4 trillion in the next ten years, digital marketers need to ensure they are up-to-date on the latest trends and technologies, especially as consumers continue to utilize online booking capabilities. Nearly half of travelers begin trip planning with a search engine, 30% on social media and 23% watch videos, so utilizing the power of digital advertising and ensuring your brand is front-and-center in the planning process is key. It’s essential for marketers/media planners to understand the different types of travelers, how they are deciding where to go, when they’re booking and how to reach them in order to execute a winning programmatic campaign. So, Digilant has complied an infographic, based on industry research and insights, outlining the answers to all these questions.

 

Download the infographic here.

Part 5: The Power of Programmatic – Next Steps

The power of programmatic is unmistakable when it comes to the travel industry. Consumers peruse through apps, websites, and social media accounts when trip planning and the amount of information they come across is overwhelming. They are overloaded with clutter from advertisers, influencers and friends at all times of the day. Simplicity is difficult to come across amidst streams of mass messages. And consumers are discouraged. To ease their frustrations, your brand needs to reach out to targets in individualized ways at the right places and times. Programmatic makes this possible by matching the most accurate travel ads to the most promising groups of consumers in seconds.
Why Programmatic? What’s the Use?
Employing programmatic techniques means targeting audiences as accurately as possible. It’s an automated process that digitally purchases ads, serving the right campaigns to consumers based on past browsing habits. It’s an area of advertising that is booming and becoming a necessity across industries. By 2022, about 90% of mobile display ads will be processed programmatically. And 78% of travelers are downloading more, (or the same amount) of travel apps this year than they did in 2018. Tech users grow and tech applications only continue to advance. To keep up — especially in the travel industry, where tech is heavily relied upon — programmatic must be used to successfully catch the attention of consumers who rely on their mobile devices and laptop screens.

How Can Programmatic Engage With Travelers?
When it comes to travel planning, the customer journey is a lengthy, exhausting one. To simplify lives and make a profit, begin to track and act on programmatic campaigns with the following in mind:

  • Optimize Your Creative: Visuals speak louder than words in the travel industry. Today’s tech allows marketers to reach out to consumers with data in mind. They have extensive access to names, past browsing histories, locations, and so on. Using these past engagements to fuel stronger, more personalized ads in the future can assist in amplifying interest (Read more about optimizing creative with DCO here). Programmatic makes the development and successful delivery of these ads more than possible. And by mixing these abilities with mobile, your company has the ability to make great impact upon summer 2019 travelers.
  • Mobile is the place to be: 46% of travel brands feel like they haven’t invested enough in mobile tactics. Another 16% of brands have strayed away from mobile marketing entirely. Regardless of where your company stands, consider the immense power of social media upon today’s tourists. They are always using their phones. They travel with them and rely upon them. Advertising on mobile, is becoming the best way to communicate with travelers in 2019. To not invest would mean missing out on reaching massive groups of prospective consumers.
  • Use Your Voice: More and more, consumers are coming to terms with the idea, and beyond that, the benefits of artificial intelligence and chatbots. Millennials and Gen Z consumers believe that chatbots of digital assistants would make the booking process easier and business travelers are already actively using voice assistants to check-in to their flight or check the status of it. So, consumers are already expecting to be able to connect with a voice – real or artificial – during travel, making it essential that your brand is prepared for this capability.

Make sure you are all set for the 2019 summer travel season by ensuring your programmatic plans are reaching their full potential. Interested in learning how Digilant can help with your next programmatic video buy? Contact us here.

2019 Travel & Tourism Trends: A Digital Marketer’s Programmatic Passport – Part 4

Summer is a little over a month away and digital consumers are just a search, scroll, and click away from taking advantage of the flexibility that the season grants, as many take a break from their day-to-day and book the perfect getaway. As one of the largest industries, projected to reach $2.4 trillion in the next ten years, digital marketers need to ensure they are up-to-date on the latest trends and technologies, especially as consumers continue to utilize online booking capabilities. Nearly half of travelers begin trip planning with a search engine, 30% on social media and 23% watch videos, so utilizing the power of digital advertising and ensuring your brand is front-and-center in the planning process is key. It’s essential for marketers/media planners to understand the different types of travelers, how they are deciding where to go, when they’re booking and how to reach them in order to execute a winning programmatic campaign. So, Digilant has complied an infographic, based on industry research and insights, outlining the answers to all these questions.

Download the infographic here.

Part 4: The Rise of Artificial Intelligence and Chatbots

Artificial intelligence in the form of chatbots and voice assistants is making travel planning a simpler endeavor for today’s travelers. 36% of Gen Z and 32% of millennial consumers in the US already believe digital assistants are simplifying the booking process. Younger travelers crave being in constant communication. As they engage with hotel, airline, and rental car brands, they want to connect, (either with human or bot) at every stage of the process. There are trillions of questions that arise when vacation planning — particularly regarding prices, locations, activities, etc. — and A.I. has the power to address concerns and solve problems quicker than ever before. Companies affiliated with the travel industry must prioritize combining technology with communication this year because by 2020, almost 85% of consumer interactions will come to life through bot conversationalists.

What’s the Appeal? Why AI?
Adding artificial elements to your brand’s site or mobile app will enhance your consumer’s journeys tremendously. Today’s travelers have little time to submit contact forms and wait weeks for responses back – they are preoccupied and impatient, seeking accurate answers in real-time, so being directed from place to place like a pinball is discouraging. With a bot or voice assistant, a consumer knows where to ask a question and trusts that these devices will either (a) give them the answer or (b) direct them to someone who can answer the concern right away. This technology has the power to give your brand a unique voice that is strong, efficient, and entirely consumer-focused. Whether chatbot, mobile trip planning app, (think of Walt Disney World’s My Disney Experience app) or Amazon Alexa voice command, artificial intelligence provides instant connectivity that is accurate and straight-to-the-point. It’s the transparent communication revolution that travelers have been craving for years. Embracing advanced technology will not only enhance the planning process, but the entire vacation itself.

Why Should a Brand Invest?

30% of travelers have used chat platforms to research and solidify trips. Another 60% would be comfortable doing so in the future. Consumer interests aside, technology is advancing and expanding across the globe quickly. Ample voice assistants are being introduced to the public. More chatbot businesses are forming and expanding their reach to companies across all industries. Simply put, sitting out on artificial intelligence is no longer a viable option. As the preferences and expectations of consumers change, so do a brand’s operations and strategies. Investing in A.I. comes at a hefty price, but its power to transform how your company forms relationships with vendors and consumers is undeniable. 40% of travel brands plan to use 2019 to invest in voice technology. By implementing new tech, your company is able to become a top competitor in today’s long awaited, extremely profitable, newly embraced A.I world that is here to stay.

Case Study: CPG Brand Targeting Millennial Moms

Consumer packaged goods (CPG) companies have had some of the most iconic advertisements of all time (think: the Oscar Mayer jingle, Dos Equis’ “The Most Interesting Man in the World” campaign and Dove’s body positivity campaigns). However, in more recent years, CPG companies have struggled to make an impact in the digital sphere due to changes in their industry. This can be attributed to a few reasons, but as trends shift and digital capabilities advance, these companies are realizing the benefits of shifting ad spend toward digital advertisements, and more specifically, programmatic advertising.
Changes in the CPG Industry
As more companies turn to digital advertising, in particular, programmatic advertising, to increase brand awareness, sales, and consumer loyalty, the CPG industry has remained a step behind. This isn’t due to a lack of effort, but rather the following disadvantages:

  • Legacy CPG brands are not [yet] direct-to-consumer. When consumers are running low on shampoo, they often don’t purchase shampoo directly through a brand shampoo company’s website, but rather they make their purchase through a third-party seller online or in-store. Traditionally, CPG companies have relied on these third-party retailers to promote and sell their products.
  • The CPG category is becoming more crowded than ever.  With more CPG companies joining the industry than ever before it can be easy to get lost in the mix.
  • Disruptor brands are making noise with direct-to-consumer or subscription models. Newly emerged CPG brands are cutting out middle-man retailers and enabling consumers to make purchases directly with the brand. This business model allows them to advertise a lower price and in some cases pass along savings to consumers, resulting in stolen market share from legacy brands.Brand loyalty drivers have evolved. Gen Z and Millennials prefer experiences over product. The appeal of CPG brands goes far beyond owning the actual product. For Gen Z and Millennials it’s as much about the experience surrounding the product itself. Brands that deliver on the expected brand experience are the brands winning the hearts and minds over those brands relying on traditional loyalty drivers.

Time for CPG to Go Digital
For decades, legacy CPG brands were the only brands that could afford to invest in expensive  TV advertising. But now as mobile has surpassed television ad spend, there is more opportunity for CPG brands to jump on-board the digital trend – transforming their advertising plans. Brands no longer need hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of dollars for one television spot. There are now ample opportunities for companies with smaller advertising budgets to utilize mobile, display, social, video and out-of-home – and these platforms also have a more targeted, larger reach.
Because CPG brands, big or small, can now afford to advertise on a variety of platforms, they no longer have to rely on their third-party retailers to get their message to consumers. The shift in advertising is also shifting the brand messaging for CPG – they are now speaking directly to the consumer.
Incorporating Programmatic
A huge advantage in incorporating more digital advertising for CPG brands, is the ability to better target consumers and measure the success of the campaign on both upper and lower funnel KPI’s. CPG brands can now target consumers based on age, income, interests, mobile-usage and many more specific tactics. Additionally, they can incorporate location attribution and sales lift measurement to report back on the success of the campaign in driving in-store traffic and sales. Below is a case study example of a CPG – orange juice brand that drove campaign success using a programmatic approach to digital advertising. Let’s get into it!
Case Study: CPG Brand targeting Millennial Moms
Challenge: A leading CPG – orange juice brand wanted to maximize the consumer demand for their juice products. In particular, they aimed to reach Millennial Moms and discover new insights about orange juice purchasing behavior. Together with their agency they partnered with Digilant to drive their programmatic advertising strategy.
Strategy: Digilant deployed a programmatic advertising strategy that leveraged mobile app audience data and insights made available through PushSpring, a data marketplace offering mobile app audience data and insights, to create a custom audience of potential orange juice purchasers. Specifically, we targeted consumer based on a variety of demographics including Millennial Moms who:

  • Shopped at Trader Joe’s, Whole Foods, Kroger or Costco
  • Have mobile apps such as PinterestCozi, Edmodo, Parents Magazine, or Family Locator

By creating and testing a variety of PushSpring audiences, the campaign was analyzed and it was determined that a specific data segment honed in on the exact audience the brand was looking to engage with.
To measure campaign performance, Digilant worked with a local attribution partner, to report on brand lift and purchase intent. In addition, Digilant and the orange juice brand created a five question survey to gauge the following insights: intent to purchase, brand consideration, spending habits, and more. Survey responses were then broken down by audience demographics resulting in a better understanding of target potential orange juice purchasers and audience-optimized programmatic advertising strategy.
In conclusion, these insights led to a successful programmatic campaign; we achieved the highest CTP from Millennial Moms – hitting the target audience requested from the client. This is just one of many examples of programmatic capabilities that increase target-specific brand awareness.
Results: Identified highest performing Millennial Mom audience segment resulting in a .30% CTR on Pinterest (~5X higher than Google’s industry standard CTR)

Discovered nuances between Millennial mom and male consumers.

  • Millennial moms consumers are more likely to engage with ads on display/desktop while male consumers are most likely to engage with ads shown in-store.

Download the case study here: Case-Study-CPG-Brand-Targeting-Millennial-Moms.
Interested in learning more about the benefits of incorporating programmatic advertising to your CPG brand’s advertising efforts? Contact us here.

2019 Travel & Tourism Trends: A Digital Marketer’s Programmatic Passport – Part 3

Summer is a little over a month away and digital consumers are just a search, scroll, and click away from taking advantage of the flexibility that the season grants, as many take a break from their day-to-day and book the perfect getaway. As one of the largest industries, projected to reach $2.4 trillion in the next ten years, digital marketers need to ensure they are up-to-date on the latest trends and technologies, especially as consumers continue to utilize online booking capabilities. Nearly half of travelers begin trip planning with a search engine, 30% on social media and 23% watch videos, so utilizing the power of digital advertising and ensuring your brand is front-and-center in the planning process is key. It’s essential for marketers/media planners to understand the different types of travelers, how they are deciding where to go, when they’re booking and how to reach them in order to execute a winning programmatic campaign. So, Digilant has complied an infographic, based on industry research and insights, outlining the answers to all these questions.
Download the infographic here.

Part 3: The Impact of Social Media on Travel

Social media has completely changed the face of traveling. Visiting another place no longer means relaxation in the form of cutting ties with technology. Traveling is now synonymous with social media usage and it’s a hard fact to come to terms with. The pictures taken during vacations are beautiful, (the 97% of millennials who have posted content from their trips would agree,) but the pressure behind the process is immense. Society now thinks it’s unusual to travel and not post a photo or share a story about it on social media. Because of these new expectations, around 90% of travel agents now consider social media to be an integral part of the marketing plan. More people are traveling and embracing the digital space while doing so. To catch attention and increase profitability, advertisers will need to dominate the digital space before, during, and after the big summer travel season of 2019.

What Social Media Accounts are Being Used?
Facebook and Instagram are, by far, the most used social media accounts by today’s travelers. Whether scrolling through posts before, during, or after vacations, consumers are actively sharing and scrolling through travel-based posts from their mobile devices. Instagram is especially popular for 16 to 24 year olds, but Facebook is the number one go-to for older generations. Each of these apps are visually-driven, which explains why many choose colorful, exotic destinations to visit when taking time off. Summer travelers don’t want photos just for the memories – they want photos that’ll be sure to stick out across their digital feeds and timelines. Because of this intense “Instagrammability” pressure, 28% of travelers consider booking an attractive property a top task in the planning process. 20% will even style accommodations to look more expensive while others run amuck in search of content they can tag as #goals. The face of travel has completely changed. Whether for good or bad, this industry (which impacts most – if not all – industries) has become dependent upon social media usage.
What Does This Mean for Marketing?
With this in mind, advertisers and agencies need to hold on tight to digital identities. The physical world depends so heavily on the digital space now. Simply put: If your brand isn’t present online, it’s not present at all. To grab the attention of today’s travelers, you need to meet with them and communicate effectively with them via tech before reaching out in person. 62% of millennials will be more loyal to a company with an engaging, interactive presence on social media. Because millennials make up a big chunk of 2019 travelers, begin to craft ideas about how you can grasp their attention. Garnering likes is great, sure, but aim to get comments, reviews, and shares. These actions require users to think and put forth an extra ounce of energy. To obtain these metrics, craft giveaways, surveys, incentives, and programmatic posts that bring their personalities into the picture. Many companies are taking it a step further by offering shoppable posts that allow users to book and buy right on the spot. Streamlining via social media makes it simple to complete transactions without distractions or complications. Travel planning no longer means billions of tabs, millions of questions, and hundreds of hours. It’s just like buying a shirt you see your favorite influencer wearing in an Instagram post — way too simple.

2019 Travel & Tourism Trends: A Digital Marketer’s Programmatic Passport – Part 2

Summer is a little over a month away and digital consumers are just a search, scroll, and click away from taking advantage of the flexibility that the season grants, as many take a break from their day-to-day and book the perfect getaway. As one of the largest industries, projected to reach $2.4 trillion in the next ten years, digital marketers need to ensure they are up-to-date on the latest trends and technologies, especially as consumers continue to utilize online booking capabilities. Nearly half of travelers begin trip planning with a search engine, 30% on social media and 23% watch videos, so utilizing the power of digital advertising and ensuring your brand is front-and-center in the planning process is key. It’s essential for marketers/media planners to understand the different types of travelers, how they are deciding where to go, when they’re booking and how to reach them in order to execute a winning programmatic campaign. So, Digilant has complied an infographic, based on industry research and insights, outlining the answers to all these questions.
Download the infographic here.

Part 2: How and When Travelers Book

In 2015, the average traveler would click through 38 websites before booking a trip. In 2019, that number has dropped to 4.4 websites. As more sites and digital experiences improve, trip planning processes become simplified and streamlined. Consumers are no longer hit with a million different options at once when searching for hotels, destinations, or flights, instead, the use of data has made online searching less complicated with the delivery of targeted links and ads. This simplicity, paired with an increased desire to see and do more, has altered how travelers decide where to go and when. For summer 2019 travelers, expect the following habits as consumers begin to pack and venture elsewhere.

The Booking Process
A majority of summer travelers will be unphased by brand loyalty this year. Only 9% already know what brands they want to book with while others remain unbiased. Travelers, (younger consumers especially) are more concerned about price and convenience. Brand consideration, therefore, will only come into play after an affordable, time convenient option rises to the surface. 60% of US consumers consider an impulse trip based on a good hotel or flight deal. Whether it’s a high-end hotel discount or questionable red-eye flight offer, price assures commitment. This motivation will mean a rise in shorter, last-minute trips across age-groups in 2019.

Additional Influences
A consumer finds an affordable flight one day and they’re on their way to a tropical destination the next. Sure, the price played a part, but what encouraged them to travel in the first place? When it comes to social media, 37% of consumers claim to be influenced by destination-based photos and videos posted by others. Compare that number to the 24% of travelers who are motivated by branded travel ads.  As 97% of millennials post content from their trips on social media, more and more consumers are compelled to make purchases. They rely on the words of others and remain vigilant of trends. With more posts comes more influence and, as a result, more reasons to travel.
Instagram post or travel advertisement, today’s consumers are heavily impacted by visual content. They rank Instagram – a visually powered app  – as one of the most influential platforms for travel-based advertisements. Popularity in photo and video driven apps has quickly made “the image” the most memorable part of any campaign, especially when it’s targeted and uniquely personalized. Investing in appealing, high-quality images has quickly become a necessity when it comes to communicating with today’s consumers. This is especially the case when reaching out to the vacation, digitally minded consumers who will be traveling during the summer of 2019.

2019 Travel & Tourism Trends: A Digital Marketer’s Programmatic Passport – Part 1

Summer is a little over a month away and digital consumers are just a search, scroll, and click away from taking advantage of the flexibility that the season grants, as many take a break from their day-to-day and book the perfect getaway. As one of the largest industries, projected to reach $2.4 trillion in the next ten years, digital marketers need to ensure they are up-to-date on the latest trends and technologies, especially as consumers continue to utilize online booking capabilities. Nearly half of travelers begin trip planning with a search engine, 30% on social media and 23% watch videos, so utilizing the power of digital advertising and ensuring your brand is front-and-center in the planning process is key. It’s essential for marketers/media planners to understand the different types of travelers, how they are deciding where to go, when they’re booking and how to reach them in order to execute a winning programmatic campaign. So, Digilant has complied an infographic, based on industry research and insights, outlining the answers to all these questions.
Download the infographic here.

Part 1: The Different Types of Travelers

People of different generations will be jumping on planes, renting cars, and exploring various areas of the globe this summer for a number of reasons. Whether venturing for business or relaxation, travel consumerism is on the rise. Looking into who is traveling and why, (especially far in advance) can determine how and when your company engages with the right audience. Generations respond to ads in different ways, at different times. To resonate with targets best, consider Digilant’s findings regarding this year’s most impactful groups of travelers:

Who will be traveling in 2019?
The Dominant Force (baby boomers): Those born between 1946 and 1964, will be the dominant group of travelers in 2019. They are projected to go on 4 to 5 trips this year, particularly on longer vacations based around upgraded accommodations. This group puts an emphasis on finding the best hotel rooms, flight arrangements, and dining plans, which explains why they spend 20 to 50% more on trips than any other group. They secure excursions far in advance –  31% already booked 2019 trips by September 2018 – and actively keep tabs on future vacations. They will be traveling internationally this year, (over 40% of international travelers will be going to Europe) and domestically.
The Last Minute Travelers (Millennials): This group is also expected to take 4 to 5 trips in 2019. What’s unique about this group, however, is their universal expertise in planning at the very last minute. They leap at the opportunity to go on authentic, transformative experiences and approach their planning processes in sporadic ways. They’re not just searching for a beautiful destination – they’re searching for a destination chock-full of inspirational activities. And if that comes together a month (or week) in advance, they’ll make it happen. Because of their delayed interest in the thrill, millennials have quickly come to represent $50 billion worth of travel consumerism in the US.

Traveling for the #Gram (Gen Z):  These consumers have a completely different approach to traveling. They’ll be taking around 3 trips this year, many journeying to picturesque locations around the globe. They prioritize aesthetic and are heavily swayed by travel-based images and videos found on social media. 40% prioritize Instagrammability when choosing a destination and 51% want to go somewhere new, especially a place their friends haven’t been to before. The joy in being able to post from a vacation spot before anyone else is what compels them to invest the time and money into traveling elsewhere.
These three groups have unique travel interests, timelines and budgets so clumping them all into one big group of “travelers” is not an effective way to reach and interact with them. Utilizing programmatic tactics that allow you to specifically hone in on your ideal target is essential when determining where to place your media dollars. Interested in learning more about how to properly target different travelers in 2019? Reach out to us here.

SEM: What is it and Why Should it be part of your Digital Media Plan?

Search engine marketing is not something to miss out on when it comes to advertising to today’s digitally-oriented consumers. These are people who find answers to their most pressing, personal questions through a search bar — and they aren’t interested in searching for very long. Patience is limited and annoyance is rampant as users travel to the second or third pages of Google’s search engine results pages (SERPs). To serve them best whilst simultaneously increasing site traffic, a brand must strive to be a leading, first page result. Search engine marketing, or SEM, is the solution that, when navigated correctly, can increase a brand’s awareness by 80%. And as little as $5 per day can get a company started when choosing to work with pay per click (PPC) advertisements. 
SEM is an effective, low-cost solution that marketers and media planners across industries are using to increase site traffic. By using Google Ads, (a popular SEM management platform,) any business has the ability to double their marketing investment. Users can customize ads by type, consumer segment, and geographic location to reach the most promising, profitable searchers possible. And when SEM is paired with programmatic, a brand not only turns up on the first page, but does so in a relevant, highly engaging way. The following information serves as an SEM refresher for any brand hoping to become a leading search engine competitor in 2019 and beyond. By understanding this information, your company can surely rise to the top of the page and to the top of a consumer’s mind:

What SEM Terms Should A Brand Become Familiar With?
The following concepts are essentials. By familiarizing yourself with these terms, marketers and media planners become better prepared for SEM implementation and management. How, when, and to what degree they’re used depends on the brand’s desired goals:

  • SERPs, or Search Engine Results Pages: The pages chock full of ads and links that pop up when a consumer conducts an online search query.
  • DAs, or Domain Authority: The strength of a domain that determines its placement on a SERP. This term was coined by Moz, an SEO software company, and compares the power of one domain to another, (allowing the stronger, more applicable site to show up first.)
  • Paid Keywords: Paid keywords come into play when a company pays to have their website show up near the top of a SERP. This is the allocation of funds toward certain keywords or phrases that a target consumer would likely type into a search bar. By paying to be associated with certain words, your brand is able to increase reach and site visibility to target audiences.
  • Organic Keywords: Organic keywords are unpaid words or phrases that trigger your website to show up in an SERP. These words lead to a natural ranking of websites based on search engine algorithms. To increase chances of being a top SERP link, a brand is encouraged to adjust their SEO practices as applicable, (i.e include popular search words in website links, titles, and descriptions).
  • Long-Tail Keywords: Longer queries that are recorded in a website’s search bar. These keywords are longer than three words and are typically highly specific questions or requests.
  • SEO vs. SEM: SEO, or search engine optimization, and SEM are used conjunctively to increase a brand’s visibility on a SERP. SEO is an unpaid tactic that falls under SEM and is all about researching, adjusting, and implementing certain tactics to make a brand’s content a top SERP result. SEM, or search engine marketing, involves both SEO and paid (possibly PPC) search ads or listings. It’s the larger umbrella term that accounts for any initiative made by a brand — paid or unpaid — to reach more people from a desired SERP placement.

What are the Common Search Ad Formats?

  • Traditional PPC Text Ads: Text-based advertisements that can be found at the top, bottom, or side of organic SERP listings. These postings must display themselves as ads, (via icon or statement) and are only paid for when a consumer clicks on them. A brand chooses which keywords trigger these ads to appear and what circumstances to take into consideration, including timing, location, and demographics. These ads operate on a bidding system, so the higher a brand pays, the higher their website is displayed, post-inquiry.
  • Google Shopping Ads: Search engine shopping ads are commonly used by e-commerce retailers. These ads pair photos with product details and are displayed on SERPs and Google’s Shopping tab. They pertain to certain keywords, (paid or organic) and compare prices to similar products posted by other merchants.
  • Display Ads: Google’s Display Network can be used to promote display ads on Google’s search engine and alternate sites. These photo or video ads appear naturally as users peruse through hundreds of websites and apps. Brands can even choose to serve up retargeting PPC display ads to consumers who had already purchased from them or visited their site within a certain timeframe. It’s a strategy that reaches 90% of internet users globally, allowing companies to reach users off-site in an attempt to reign in interest at a low cost.
  • Video Ads: Video ads have been increasing in popularity thanks to advancements in the form of faster speeds and higher-quality digital platforms. YouTube — purchased by Google in 2006 — is now the third most visited site on the web. More than 1 billion hours of YouTube videos are watched every single day. To hone in on this market, more advertisers are beginning to communicate with target audiences via video ads across video platforms. These PPC ads can be displayed in the form of banners, in-stream video ads and in-video overlay ads.

Why Pair SEM With Programmatic?
SEM initiatives are promising. But when SEM is paired with programmatic, expect even greater results. The data gathered from consumers through programmatic campaigns is extremely insightful. Having this information on-hand can help marketers gain an understanding about the audiences they’re hoping to target with SEM. Knowing how, when, and why someone searches can assist advertisers in writing ad copy, choosing keywords, and reaching the right people on the right sites. Simply put: programmatic is the roadmap that tells you exactly what a consumer is searching for. And our team at Digilant can assist in combining the two together to reach the strongest results possible. For more information, learn about our Search Engine+ Solution here, which unlocks quality URLs and relevant ad placements for brands across industries.

2019 Travel & Tourism Trends: A Digital Marketer’s Programmatic Passport

Summer is a little over a month away and digital consumers are just a search, scroll, and click away from taking advantage of the flexibility that the season grants, as many take a break from their day-to-day and book the perfect getaway. As one of the largest industries, projected to reach $2.4 trillion in the next ten years, digital marketers need to ensure they are up-to-date on the latest trends and technologies, especially as consumers continue to utilize online booking capabilities.
Nearly half of travelers begin trip planning with a search engine, 30% on social media and 23% watch videos, so utilizing the power of digital advertising and ensuring your brand is front-and-center in the planning process is key. It’s essential for marketers/media planners to understand the different types of travelers, how they are deciding where to go, when they’re booking and how to reach them in order to execute a winning programmatic campaign. So, Digilant has complied an infographic, based on industry research and insights, outlining the answers to all these questions.

The infographic features:

1. The Different Types of Travelers

There are key generational differences between travelers – what they are seeking, when they book and their most desirable destinations.

2. How and When Travelers Book:

Consumers are booking last-minute trips and activities now more than ever, especially on mobile.

3. The Impact of Social Media on Travel

Younger travelers prioritize sharing their trips on Instagram, so much so that they will not book a destination if it isn’t  #instaworthy.

4. The Rise of Artificial Intelligence

Hone in on the business traveler with artificial intelligence who are quickly moving from destination to destination so they’re looking for any way to make their traveling easier.

5. The Power of Programmatic… Next Steps

Digilant has outlined our top tips to make sure all digital marketers are ready for a successful 2019 summer travel season.

Interested in expanding your travel or tourism brands’ digital marketing presence? Reach out to us here to learn more.

Programmatic: A Great Fit for Retail Brands

Retail brands are beginning to outfit themselves head-to-toe in programmatic. The fashion industry is evolving quickly for small boutiques, large wholesale chains, and everything in between, and consumer shopping habits are changing. Technological advancements have made shopping digitally simple, (and, for the most part, preferred) but ample consumers still find joy in shopping at brick-and-mortar locations. So how can programmatic be used both online and offline to effectively reach today’s active, digitally-minded consumers? This year, more than 95% of retailers are planning to increase their online media spending significantly. And as more people shop for clothes —  something that will never go out of style — the more pertinent programmatic becomes. As a media planner or marketer working in fashion, consider the following information as you begin to allocate your attention to the digital space:

Why Now? What’s Been Holding the Fashion Industry Back?

The apparel industry isn’t going anywhere anytime soon. People find joy in buying and creating outfits, but shopping habits have become confusing. Today’s consumers are especially mixed when it comes to how and where they buy their newest attire. That being said, data has become an essential competitive advantage among retailers of any size. It unlocks information about past shopping habits, item preferences, geographic locations, and so on. But many fashion brands don’t know where to begin when it comes to using, (and finding) data to personalize offers and enhance retail experiences. Other industries are soaring ahead when it comes to using programmatic as those in fashion are held back, hesitant and confused. This hasn’t been a voluntary choice for many. Ample retailers are constrained by fast fashion’s rapidly changing discounts and product assortments. SKU numbers are complex and competition for ad space is intense. What’s worse, ⅓ of fashion brands currently lack the expertise necessary to realize the full potential, power, and profitability of digital marketing. Simply put: the fashion industry has been missing out on digital because it’s a field that hasn’t been prioritized. Through data enforcement and the creation of new, in-house tech teams, retailers have the power to leap ahead of age-old industry roadblocks. And by implementing programmatic, (or the buying and selling of ads in-real-time) communication can be established with consumers in seconds. It’s the digital tool retailers have been hoping for that keeps up with the industry’s speed while simultaneously increasing brand awareness.

What are the Pros of Programmatic?

The consumers of today are practically feeding their personal information into the digital space. The phones in their hands, the receipts at the bottom of their bags — the data readily available to fashion brands is alarming. Programmatic makes this data mean something. And its benefits, highlighted below, can reap major rewards for those hoping to dominate the retail space in 2019 and beyond:

  • It stresses personalization: Less than 10% of fashion brands are personalizing communications via email, paid social, and display advertisements. But with programmatic, a tool that uses data to individually reach people at the right place and time, past marketing behavior becomes revolutionized. What’s most interesting about this lack of digital personalization is the fact that retail is known for forming personalized, mutually beneficial relationships with consumers. Thankfully, with programmatic, the same can be done in the digital space. It’s a tool that allows a brand to greet, understand, and recognize consumers again in a luxurious and intimate way.

 

  • It expands reach: Programmatic strengthens relationships with current consumers. It can also help retailers reach future consumers who are likely to be attracted to their brand’s offerings. In an industry that is always expanding and growing, this ability to target lookalikes with catered products and services has become increasingly important.

 

  • It creates an impressive data portfolio: Data gathered from programmatic initiatives can be altered at any time. Messaging can be amplified, designs can be changed — It streamlines creative with numbers to paint a picture of total campaign effectiveness. Programmatic’s data builds a single view of every single consumer a company comes into contact with. It records how they react to ads and, most importantly, what actions they take after seeing them. From there, a brand has the power to use what was learned in the past to create a stronger future.

More and more consumers are beginning to expect personalized treatment from brands across industries. In fashion, retailers that plan to use technology, especially in the form of programmatic, to better understand the past, present, and future behavior of consumers will rise ahead. They’ll obtain optimal market share, awareness, and satisfaction from consumers. And as the landscape of retail changes daily across touchpoints, they’ll be the digital, confident, well dressed stores left standing.

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